Monthly Archives: June 2019

How To Go Keto: 20 Grams of Carbs 5 Different Ways

Ketogenic diets are in the news these days, and I’m glad because the more people discover the benefits of a ketogenic nutrition strategy, the more support low carb fans will get from the medical establishment.

Speaking of which, Joy Kiddie MSC, RD reports that the ADA and European Association now Classify Low Carb Diets as Medical Nutrition Therapy. This means that low carb diets are officially recognized as a legitimate strategy for managing conditions like Diabetes Type II. This is definitely a relief for anyone who has faced criticism for choosing very low carb diet.

In my case, keeping my total carbohydrate intake at right around 20 grams per day, mainly from vegetables that grow above the ground, keeps me lean, happy, and sane. The past few weeks have been full of fun and celebrations with my husband and son, but that has meant lots of eating out, which leads to weight gain in my case. I get back on track by turning to my, “Strong Keto” meal plans which contain my favorite low carb veggies in the right amount to create satisfaction and weight release. I use Fitday.com to track them, and I have shared them below so that you can see my method of putting together a days worth of “Freedom Friendly” carbs. If you have Sugar Freedom you will probably notice that these menus are suitable for the 3 Day Sugar Strike. Once your appetite is well managed and fat loss has begun, you can add back more carbs, including low sugar fruits, until you find your personal level of carbohydrate tolerance. Hey, I think I just found my topic for next weeks blog post.

Until then, stay strong and Keto On. (Note: Scroll Down For Details.)

What makes a food plan Keto? Keeping carbs to 20 grams per day.

Are you an exercise compensator?

Back when I was struggling to overcome obesity back in 2008, I was doing up to 12 hours of cardio per week, and doing my best to follow a low fat/low calorie diet.

Maybe this sounds familiar to you. I would try to be “good,” for a few weeks and I might lose five pounds, only to end up bingeing on sweets and starches, and gaining it all back almost overnight. It was especially frustrating because a few of the other clients in the gym, plus the trainers always said that cardio worked for them.

I admit, I thought that they were in denial, or just saying what they were supposed to say about exercising for weight loss, but they may have been telling the truth as they saw it. Here is the abstract to a study of 35 obese, sedentary individuals who went on a cardio exercise program for 12 weeks:

Individual variability following 12 weeks of supervised exercise: identification and characterization of compensation for exercise-induced weight loss.

King NA1Hopkins MCaudwell PStubbs RJBlundell JE.

Author information

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: 

To identify and characterize the individual variability in compensation for exercise-induced changes in energy expenditure (EE).

DESIGN: 

Twelve-week exercise intervention.

SUBJECTS: 

Thirty-five overweight and obese sedentary men and women (body mass index, 31.8+/-4.1 kg m(-2); age, 39.6+/-11.0 years) were prescribed exercise five times per week for 12 weeks under supervised conditions.

MEASUREMENTS: 

Body weight, body composition, resting metabolic rate (RMR), total daily energy intake (EI) and subjective appetite sensations were measured at weeks 0 and 12.

RESULTS: 

When all subjects’ data were pooled, the mean reduction in body weight (3.7+/-3.6 kg) was significant (P<0.0001) and as predicted, which suggested no compensation for the increase in EE. However, further examination revealed a large individual variability in weight change (-14.7 to +1.7 kg). Subjects were identified as compensators (C) or noncompensators (NC) based on their actual weight loss (mean NC=6.3+/-3.2 kg and C=1.5+/- 2.5 kg) relative to their predicted weight loss. C and NC were characterized by their different metabolic and behavioural compensatory responses. Moderate changes in RMR occurred in C (-69.2+/-268.7 kcal day(-1)) and NC (14.2+/-242.7 kcal day(-1)). EI and average daily subjective hunger increased by 268.2+/-455.4 kcal day(-1) and 6.9+/-11.4 mm day(-1) in C, whereas EI decreased by 130+/-485 kcal day(-1) and there was no change in subjective appetite (0.4+/-9.6 mm day(-1)) in NC.

CONCLUSION: 

These results demonstrate that expressing the exercise-induced change in body weight as a group mean conceals the large inter-individual variability in body weight and compensatory responses. Individuals who experience a lower than predicted weight.

What a difference: from 33 pounds lost for the most responsive exerciser, to nearly 4 pounds gained for the most susceptible “Compensator.” I know from my experience, and that of many other Sugar Freedom readers that cutting sugar, grains, and excessive cardio can prevent the hunger and cravings that derail the best weight loss intentions. So what should compensators do instead? For the past 11 years a combination of resistance exercise and short rounds of interval training have kept me lean, strong, and energized. Please check out the workouts on my you tube channel, and remember to listen to your body, and honor how you respond.

Feel free to e-mail me: catherine@cardiofreedom.com with any questions!